Stylus

Evolving Athleisure: A/W 2022 Store Openings

Published 04 January 2023

Author
Marta Mąkolska
2 min read

Athleisure is on the rise, with the global activewear market forecast to reach $455bn by 2027 – up by 20% from 2022 (Statista, 2022). New store designs present diverse engagement strategies, from a community-focused format and a tactile environment...

  • Fitting Room Turns Personal Yoga Studio at Sweaty Betty, London: The fitting rooms at UK activewear brand Sweaty Betty’s store within the new Battersea Power Station development in London – its largest destination to date – occupy a third of the 2,400 sq ft space. The individual circular pods featuring adjustable lighting are twice the size of a standard changing room – at a diameter of two metres.

    Meanwhile, a socialised central area lets consumers (who are invited to try on products) practise yoga poses and chat with other shoppers.

  • Tactile Store Design at Beyond Yoga, Santa Monica: Los Angeles label Beyond Yoga’s first physical flagship in Santa Monica, California, comprises a neutrally coloured 4,000 sq ft interior. Its archways are made from swatches of the company’s signature “buttery soft” Spacedye fabric, which spotlight the smoothness of the products on show. Additionally, the location offers a personalised shopping experience (bookable via the brand’s e-commerce site). If you’re a repeat customer, items will be selected ahead of your visit, based on your purchase history and sizing.

    See also US fitness equipment brand Bala's New York City store, which incorporates giant versions of its offerings in the exact colours and matte sheen of the originals.

  • Community Focus at Gymshark, London: British activewear brand Gymshark’s 18,000 sq ft Regent Street flagship combines retail with a fitness centre, personal training suite and events space, alongside a Joe & the Juice The store hosts around 25 workout classes a week, bookable via the Gymshark app.

  • Fitting Room Turns Personal Yoga Studio at Sweaty Betty, London: The fitting rooms at UK activewear brand Sweaty Betty’s store within the new Battersea Power Station development in London – its largest destination to date – occupy a third of the 2,400 sq ft space. The individual circular pods featuring adjustable lighting are twice the size of a standard changing room – at a diameter of two metres.

    Meanwhile, a socialised central area lets consumers (who are invited to try on products) practise yoga poses and chat with other shoppers.

  • Tactile Store Design at Beyond Yoga, Santa Monica: Los Angeles label Beyond Yoga’s first physical flagship in Santa Monica, California, comprises a neutrally coloured 4,000 sq ft interior. Its archways are made from swatches of the company’s signature “buttery soft” Spacedye fabric, which spotlight the smoothness of the products on show. Additionally, the location offers a personalised shopping experience (bookable via the brand’s e-commerce site). If you’re a repeat customer, items will be selected ahead of your visit, based on your purchase history and sizing.

    See also US fitness equipment brand Bala's New York City store, which incorporates giant versions of its offerings in the exact colours and matte sheen of the originals.

  • Community Focus at Gymshark, London: British activewear brand Gymshark’s 18,000 sq ft Regent Street flagship combines retail with a fitness centre, personal training suite and events space, alongside a Joe & the Juice The store hosts around 25 workout classes a week, bookable via the Gymshark app.

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This article is an example of Stylus' expert research into how Retail & Brand Comms trends are evolving. Get in touch so someone from the Stylus team can explain how your business can harness the power of trends and insights like these – and more.

Want to know more?

This article is an example of Stylus' expert research into how Retail & Brand Comms trends are evolving. Get in touch so someone from the Stylus team can explain how your business can harness the power of trends and insights like these – and more.