Seniors & Technology: Health Tech’s Untapped Market

Published 31 January 2023

2 min read

In 2022, technology engagement rates amongst American seniors aged 50-90 were on the rise, with their average yearly spend on tech up 11% from 2021. A new report published by the AARP, the US interest group focused on people 50 and older, highlights how members of this cohort interact with tech – and how they’re uncovering a need for age-appropriate innovations.

  • Tech-Enabled Connections: Technology is a well-established fixture in the daily lives of so-called seniors across all age categories, from Gen X in their early 50s to members of the silent generation. Not only do 86% of the report’s respondents own a smartphone, they own six devices on average.

    While social connection remains the key driver of tech use – with 78% agreeing with the statement: "I rely on technology to stay connected and in touch with friends and family” – its largest category for potential growth is improving personal health. Though one in four say that tech enables a salubrious lifestyle, 38% say they’re unaware of how it can be used to enhance their wellbeing.

  • Tailored Solutions are Lacking: This lack of awareness is reflected in how 68% of respondents don’t believe that tech is designed with older people in mind. Echoing concerns that new technologies are too complicated, this cohort cites a confusing user experience as the biggest barrier keeping them from purchasing new products.

    Clearly, the need for easy-to-understand innovations that specifically address senior-relevant issues is growing. Look to the AlzWin from South Korea’s Seven Point One, a gadget that employs simple-to-use, machine-learning-based tests to determine if elders are at risk for developing dementia. Meanwhile, the RealSam Phone (UK) is a voice-controlled smartphone designed to be accessible to those suffering from vision loss.

  • Tech-Enabled Connections: Technology is a well-established fixture in the daily lives of so-called seniors across all age categories, from Gen X in their early 50s to members of the silent generation. Not only do 86% of the report’s respondents own a smartphone, they own six devices on average.

    While social connection remains the key driver of tech use – with 78% agreeing with the statement: "I rely on technology to stay connected and in touch with friends and family” – its largest category for potential growth is improving personal health. Though one in four say that tech enables a salubrious lifestyle, 38% say they’re unaware of how it can be used to enhance their wellbeing.

  • Tailored Solutions are Lacking: This lack of awareness is reflected in how 68% of respondents don’t believe that tech is designed with older people in mind. Echoing concerns that new technologies are too complicated, this cohort cites a confusing user experience as the biggest barrier keeping them from purchasing new products.

    Clearly, the need for easy-to-understand innovations that specifically address senior-relevant issues is growing. Look to the AlzWin from South Korea’s Seven Point One, a gadget that employs simple-to-use, machine-learning-based tests to determine if elders are at risk for developing dementia. Meanwhile, the RealSam Phone (UK) is a voice-controlled smartphone designed to be accessible to those suffering from vision loss.

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Want to know more

This article is an example of Stylus' expert research into how trends are evolving. Get in touch so someone from the Stylus team can explain how your business can harness the power of trends and insights like these – and more.