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How do Consumers Feel About Body Positivity?

Published 03 August 2022

2 min read

Diet culture and unattainable beauty standards are still ubiquitous. However, an escalating consumer preference for authentic...

In a recent survey, market research company GWI gauged how global consumers feel about body positivity, and found that it resonates more with Gen Zers (57%) than older generations (42%). Alongside generational differences, the movement seems to be failing people with a physical impairment. Only one in four consumers with disabilities find body-inclusive efforts convincing, compared to two-thirds of gym-goers.

While body positivity conversations are popular on social media, they tend to fuel unhealthy comparisons through trends like people sharing their weight and other body checking habits on TikTok or 'What I Eat in a Day' videos.

Image-sharing platform Pinterest aims to address the issue. In July, it published a Global Body Neutrality report, revealing a significant drop in searches containing ‘weight loss’ – down by 20% between July 2021 and May 2022. This comes a year after Pinterest partnered with the US National Eating Disorder Association to implement a ban on ads containing weight-loss-related language or imagery.

Initiatives promoting body inclusivity are surfacing globally, like a recent campaign by Spain’s equality ministry that encourages people of all body shapes and sizes to enjoy time at the beach without worrying about looks. Involvement from a governmental body is an advancement for the body positivity movement. However, certain issues are yet to be addressed, such as body discrimination in the medical sector and the use of outdated health metrics.

 

Get in touch so a member of the Stylus team can explain how your business can harness the power of trends and insights like these – and more.

In a recent survey, market research company GWI gauged how global consumers feel about body positivity, and found that it resonates more with Gen Zers (57%) than older generations (42%). Alongside generational differences, the movement seems to be failing people with a physical impairment. Only one in four consumers with disabilities find body-inclusive efforts convincing, compared to two-thirds of gym-goers.

While body positivity conversations are popular on social media, they tend to fuel unhealthy comparisons through trends like people sharing their weight and other body checking habits on TikTok or 'What I Eat in a Day' videos.

Image-sharing platform Pinterest aims to address the issue. In July, it published a Global Body Neutrality report, revealing a significant drop in searches containing ‘weight loss’ – down by 20% between July 2021 and May 2022. This comes a year after Pinterest partnered with the US National Eating Disorder Association to implement a ban on ads containing weight-loss-related language or imagery.

Initiatives promoting body inclusivity are surfacing globally, like a recent campaign by Spain’s equality ministry that encourages people of all body shapes and sizes to enjoy time at the beach without worrying about looks. Involvement from a governmental body is an advancement for the body positivity movement. However, certain issues are yet to be addressed, such as body discrimination in the medical sector and the use of outdated health metrics.

 

Get in touch so a member of the Stylus team can explain how your business can harness the power of trends and insights like these – and more.