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Sustainable Mobility: Material Innovations for Tyres at CES 2023

Published 23 January 2023

2 min read

Numerous material innovations that were presented at this year’s CES are set to revolutionise the tyre industry. With sustainable resources, reduced CO2 emissions and optimised efficiency all coming into play, we select the highlights.

  • Performance-Boosting: Marking its US launch, Dutch start-up CarbonX presented its proprietary performance-boosting additive, composed of nano-sized carbon filaments that are chemically formed into micro 3D structures. The material is added to tyres during production to replace silica and conventional carbon black (key compounds in traditional tyres providing strength and durability). Thanks to its composition, CarbonX improves rolling resistance without compromising grip or wear, which, in turn, reduces fuel consumption.

    The company states that if motorsport organisations like Formula One retrofitted their fleets with CarbonX tyres, they could improve their overall fuel efficiency by 1.3%, subsequently reducing their CO2 emissions.

  • Eco-Friendly Materials: Building on its CES 2022 presentation – a tyre made up of 70% sustainable materials – Goodyear unveiled an updated version comprising 90% eco-friendly content (constituting bio-based, renewable, recycled and/or lower-impact elements). It consists of 17 key ingredients, including soybean oil, rice husk ash silica, and pine resin. This new, road-approved innovation is also tested to have lower rolling resistance compared to traditional formats, and so could help with fuel efficiency.

  • Natural Rubber Alternative: Japanese manufacturer Bridgestone showcased its renewable natural rubber tyres derived from guayule – a woody desert shrub native to parts of southwest US and Mexico – with properties equivalent to the material obtained from hevea. It also requires 40% less water to grow than other plants (like cotton), and can be farmed with existing row crop equipment.

    The tyre is the result of a substantial R&D initiative started by Bridgestone in 2012, which now operates a research farm and processing plant in partnership with local producers. The company is aiming to commercialise guayule rubber by 2030.
  • Performance-Boosting: Marking its US launch, Dutch start-up CarbonX presented its proprietary performance-boosting additive, composed of nano-sized carbon filaments that are chemically formed into micro 3D structures. The material is added to tyres during production to replace silica and conventional carbon black (key compounds in traditional tyres providing strength and durability). Thanks to its composition, CarbonX improves rolling resistance without compromising grip or wear, which, in turn, reduces fuel consumption.

    The company states that if motorsport organisations like Formula One retrofitted their fleets with CarbonX tyres, they could improve their overall fuel efficiency by 1.3%, subsequently reducing their CO2 emissions.

  • Eco-Friendly Materials: Building on its CES 2022 presentation – a tyre made up of 70% sustainable materials – Goodyear unveiled an updated version comprising 90% eco-friendly content (constituting bio-based, renewable, recycled and/or lower-impact elements). It consists of 17 key ingredients, including soybean oil, rice husk ash silica, and pine resin. This new, road-approved innovation is also tested to have lower rolling resistance compared to traditional formats, and so could help with fuel efficiency.

  • Natural Rubber Alternative: Japanese manufacturer Bridgestone showcased its renewable natural rubber tyres derived from guayule – a woody desert shrub native to parts of southwest US and Mexico – with properties equivalent to the material obtained from hevea. It also requires 40% less water to grow than other plants (like cotton), and can be farmed with existing row crop equipment.

    The tyre is the result of a substantial R&D initiative started by Bridgestone in 2012, which now operates a research farm and processing plant in partnership with local producers. The company is aiming to commercialise guayule rubber by 2030.

Want to know more?

This article is an example of Stylus' expert research into how Colour & Materials trends are evolving. Get in touch so someone from the Stylus team can explain how your business can harness the power of trends and insights like these – and more.

Want to know more?

This article is an example of Stylus' expert research into how Colour & Materials trends are evolving. Get in touch so someone from the Stylus team can explain how your business can harness the power of trends and insights like these – and more.