Recreational Fishing Lures in Gen Z

Published 19 June 2023

2 min read

With Gen Zers looking for more low-fi and genteel ways to unwind, many are turning to recreational fishing as a quiet and mindful pursuit – particularly in the UK and China. Here lies a fertile opportunity for savvy, modern brands to provide age-appropriate equipment, events and facilities for this youthful cohort of anglers.

UK non-profit Angling Trust reported that around 75% of the 38,085 participants in its Get Fishing community events in 2022 were under 18. Hoping to bring like-minded people together, competition organiser Angling Live (also UK) will host friendly angling tournaments this July, as well as social events featuring a line-up of influencers like Mark Pitchers and Darrell Peck (both British).

Fishing-centric content on TikTok has also taken off, with searches for terms like #streetfishing, #carpfishing and #predatorfishing on the rise. Similarly, it has become a popular leisure activity on Chinese TikTok sister app Douyin, with related posts being viewed over 80 billion times.

In China, younger consumers are putting a distinctly Gen Z spin on recreational fishing. “Many lure fishing enthusiasts release the fish after they catch them, which is seen as more eco-friendly and cooler by younger generations,” Huo Taixiang, marketing director of the Chinese branch of Japanese fishing company Daiwa, told China Daily. “Many also dress in stylish apparel, set up tents in scenic areas, and post their photos on social media, attracting more participants.”

UK non-profit Angling Trust reported that around 75% of the 38,085 participants in its Get Fishing community events in 2022 were under 18. Hoping to bring like-minded people together, competition organiser Angling Live (also UK) will host friendly angling tournaments this July, as well as social events featuring a line-up of influencers like Mark Pitchers and Darrell Peck (both British).

Fishing-centric content on TikTok has also taken off, with searches for terms like #streetfishing, #carpfishing and #predatorfishing on the rise. Similarly, it has become a popular leisure activity on Chinese TikTok sister app Douyin, with related posts being viewed over 80 billion times.

In China, younger consumers are putting a distinctly Gen Z spin on recreational fishing. “Many lure fishing enthusiasts release the fish after they catch them, which is seen as more eco-friendly and cooler by younger generations,” Huo Taixiang, marketing director of the Chinese branch of Japanese fishing company Daiwa, told China Daily. “Many also dress in stylish apparel, set up tents in scenic areas, and post their photos on social media, attracting more participants.”