Stylus no longer supports Internet Explorer 7, 8 or 9. Please upgrade to IE 11, Chrome, Safari, Firefox or Edge. This will ensure you have the best possible experience on the site.
Stylus Blog
MENU
Clear All Filters
Filter By:
Consumer Lifestyle
Consumer Product
Food, Beverage & Hospitality (1049)
Fashion (765)
Beauty (344)
Product Design (941)
Colour & Materials (709)
Consumer Engagement
Retail (1326)
Media & Marketing (1222)
Subject
Published: 21 Sep 2017

Trending Opportunity: Time-Focused Beauty Bundles

Extra
Trending Opportunity: Time-Focused Beauty Bundles

Lifestyle marketing and time-tailored solutions are key drivers for a new wave of beauty products, touting month-long skincare programmes and special-occasion regimes that cater to consumers looking for guaranteed results. 

“There is mass appeal and a lot of promise in the merging of needs-based solutions and lifestyle marketing. This idea will grow,” Deanna Utroske, senior correspondent at industry news source CosmeticsDesign.com, told Stylus. Two new launches are capitalising on the concept of time-dedicated beauty regimes:

  • Australian skincare brand Jurlique has announced the release of its Radiance and Renewal 28 Day Programme, a two-step treatment that renews and rejuvenates dull and tired skin. The two products, used in turn for 14 days each, work alongside the skin’s natural renewal cycle. Step one is a lightweight lotion that exfoliates the skin, while step two is a cream that smooths and replenishes. The programme will be available to purchase online from October 2.
  • Body on Demand, a new brand from British beauty company Be for Beauty, offers a product regime designed to tighten and sculpt the body through the reduction of water retention.

    The three-product programme includes the 20 Mins Body Boost Bath Prep, bath salts that drive out sweat and toxins; the Everyday Body Boost Sorbet, a hydrating lotion that sculpts excess skin; and the Body Boosting Supplements that improve gut health and support natural weight loss. The products are offered in occasion-specific beauty bundles: 1 Month Holiday Prep, 2 Month Wedding Prep and Weekly Night Out.

For more on time-based beauty solutions, see Future Beauty: Perfecting Bespoke.

Published: 20 Sep 2017

Flyleather: Nike’s New Super Material

Extra
Nike Flyleather Cortez

Nike has partnered with UK-based eco leather brand E-Leather to develop a new “super material” called Flyleather.

The textile innovation was created after the sportswear giant found the production of leather – its 10th most used upper fabric – was disproportionately unsustainable compared to its other materials.

The fabric is made by mixing loose fibres and recycled leather offcuts with a polyester blend to create a paste, which is then rolled out into sheets of “new” leather. Any waste goes back into the production process, creating a closed-loop cycle. 

The flexible textile is five times stronger and 40% lighter than full-grain leather. It also uses 90% less water to produce and creates a carbon footprint 80% lower than traditional leather.

The eco-friendly material was appropriately launched to coincide with New York’s Climate Week (September 18-24) and forms part of Nike’s pledge to reduce its environmental footprint by 50% by 2020.

For more on fashion’s environmental focus, see Sustainable 360 – part of our Industry Trend The New Fashion Landscape: 2017 Update. For more on Nike’s textile innovations, see Sustainable Wardrobes.

Published: 20 Sep 2017

Sleek Campaign Tackles Make-Up Shaming

Sleek MakeUp has launched a global campaign called My Face. My Rules in a bid to tackle make-up shaming. Touching on themes of empowerment, individualism and uniqueness, it aims to positively acknowledge everyone’s right to define their own beauty.

The British brand’s comprehensive range of inclusive and accessible colour cosmetics cater to those often ignored by the mainstream beauty industry. The campaign encapsulates its core values of diversity and individuality, with images and videos featuring its own consumers, who were cast via social media. It showcases their make-up skills and inspiring responses to negative personal experiences.

The brand worked with international anti-bullying charity Ditch the Label to commission a corresponding survey. It found that 75% of people think women look better with no or less make-up, while more than a quarter of respondents had felt judged for wearing it. “We hope this research will contribute to the growing discussion against make-up shaming, and will bring us a step closer to our vision of a world that is fair, equal and free from all types of bullying,” said Liam Hackett, the charity’s founder.

Sleek MakeUp has also released a manifesto alongside the campaign that aims to encourage conversation around the representation of make-up lovers in society. It pledges to challenge beauty industry norms and continue supporting its consumers’ passion for cosmetics.

This is one of a few shrewd beauty strategies that are beginning to acknowledge marginalised and underserved markets. For more, see Advocating Realness and Gender-Fluid Generation.

Published: 20 Sep 2017

Benefactor Brands: Tiffany’s Studiomakers Plan Backs Artists

Extra
Tiffany's Studiomakers

US jewellery brand Tiffany & Co. has jumped into the growing pool of brands taking a socially active stance by launching an international artists support programme Outset, which is kicking off in London.

Seven London artists (all MA graduates from major London colleges) will receive rent-free studio space and may get an opportunity to work with Tiffany on pieces for its London stores. The move responds to London becoming prohibitively expensive for young artists to live and work in, despite its heritage as a hub for experimental creative talent.

“London is one of the most expensive cities in the world to live in. There’s a big disconnect between the cost of living and being an artist here,” said Richard Moore, Tiffany’s British-born vice-president and creative director of store design and visual merchandising.

Moore inferred that more arts-backing initiatives are to come, continuing a core brand legacy. Louis Comfort Tiffany, the brand’s inaugural design director (1902), was a leader of the Art Nouveau movement, while in the 1950s its head of design, Gene Moore, commissioned then-fledgling artists Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg to create window displays. Tiffany also sponsored the 2017 Whitney Biennial, spotlighting contemporary American artists.

Beyond illustrating brand generosity and artistic legacy, Outset also highlights Tiffany’s ongoing rebrand, from stalwart of the traditional jewellery scene to modern label. See Tiffany & Co. Rebrands Via Pop-Up and Same-Sex Tiffany Ad Fuels Rebrand.

For more on localised social advocacy, see Selfridges Launches Music Venue, Local Matters and Retail’s Activist Brands.

See also Jewellery Retail’s New Horizons

Published: 19 Sep 2017

Unilever’s State of Innovation Report

Extra
Unilever Foundry

Unilever's tech incubator Foundry launched a report on global collaboration between brands and start-ups at marketing conference Dmexco this month. The State of Innovation predicts that corporates and start-ups will work side by side in the same physical space by 2025, with four out of five (80%) businesses saying that start-ups can have a positive impact on a large company's approach to innovation.

The report emphasises that "tech tourism" – where brands make a short-term investment in start-up-driven initiatives as a kind of box-ticking innovation exercise – is of little worth. "Collaboration can no longer be viewed as an optional extra – it's a strategic imperative," said Aline Santos, Unilever's European vice-president of global marketing. "Start-ups are now widely recognised as invaluable sources of innovation, fuelling growth and providing pioneering business solutions."

The Unilever Foundry has successfully helped scale up 48% of its pilots in the past three years. One of its latest projects is a direct-to-consumer ingredients app for Hellman's in collaboration with on-demand delivery app Quiqup. See Rapid Retail: Hellmann's Trials Impulse Groceries App for more.

Incorporating start-up strategies into your business is something we discuss in Marketing Like a Start-Up, and will be exploring in even more detail in our upcoming Macro Trend, The Work/Life Revolution.

Published: 19 Sep 2017

S/S 18 Influencer Show: Preen

Preen delivered one of the season’s most delectably pretty collections, with cobweb-light silhouettes and a delicate colour palette delivering an escapist dream in today’s troubled times.

Extra
Preen S/S 18
Extra
Preen S/S 18
Extra
Preen S/S 18

Simple cottons and washed linens spoke of a more secure, homely past, worked into languid, deconstructed shapes with the tiniest accent of vivid red dressmaker embroidery.

That same homespun dressmaker feel ran through the collection’s delicate ruching and pin-tucked details, mousetail-thin rouleau ties, patchwork-effect sweaters and ‘Sunday best’ Puritan collars. Deconstructed looks were another recurring theme, best seen in boudoir-style satin and lace pieces, layered with a seductive insouciance.

Extra
Preen S/S 18
Extra
Preen S/S 18
Extra
Preen S/S 18

Soft, unstructured linen trench coats and slouchy pants added a covered-up feel to contrast with romantically wispy slip dresses worked in feather-light Chantilly lace, light-as-air silk organzas and crystal-studded cobweb lace. Meanwhile, colour reinforced the romantic escapist vibe, with a palette of barely there tinted pales and faux nude tones, shot through with flashes of vivid scarlet, black and white.

Ruffled asymmetric hems, lace edging, floral sequin motifs and off-kilter drawstring effects were just some of the details that defined the look, alongside childlike knee-high socks, deconstructed organza bonnets and simple slipper flats. 

Extra
Preen S/S 18
Extra
Preen S/S 18
Extra
Preen S/S 18

NEED TO KNOW

  • Romantic escapism
  • Weightless fabrics complemented by a delicate palette of pales and vivid red
  • Boudoir silks, lace and satins contrasted with homely cottons and washed linen
  • Dressmaker details
  • Deconstructed shirts, trench coats and slouchy pants, versus boudoir slip dresses, camisoles and ruffled tea dresses.
Published: 19 Sep 2017

Colourful Exhibition Celebrates Folk Textiles

Extra
Caitlin Hinshelwood, Kissing the Shuttle

A new exhibition by London-based artist and textile designer Caitlin Hinshelwood presents a series of strikingly coloured textile banners inspired by the folk practices of the UK’s historic weaving communities.

Kissing the Shuttle explores ideas of protest and resistance inherent among the industrial workforces of north-west England and Northern Ireland, as well as their camaraderie and traditional songs. Research drawn from various British institutions resulted in imagery influenced by the symbolism, speech and customs of the textile trades during and after the Industrial Revolution.

Referencing union banners, the large-scale textile pieces are screen-printed on silk in brilliant shades of orange, purple and green. Embellishments of rosettes, ribbons and fringing are reminiscent of folk costumes and historic trade union regalia. 

Hinshelwood’s refreshing use of colour leads to unexpected pairings. “I always try to dye a few [base fabrics] in colours I don't like or know what to do with,” she told Stylus. “It forces me to embrace new combinations and challenge my perception of colours I ‘like’.”

Her perception is also influenced by colour-blindness. “People find it surprising… but I don't really think about it,” she says. “I just make the colours as I see them or want them to be. Sometimes I realise the colour I think I've made is different to the way someone else sees it, but I don't think that really matters.”

Held at London’s Cecil Sharp House, the exhibition runs from September 26 to January 28 2018. For more on colour perception, see Breathing Colour Exhibition

Extra
Caitlin Hinshelwood, Kissing the Shuttle
Extra
Caitlin Hinshelwood, Kissing the Shuttle
Extra
Caitlin Hinshelwood, Kissing the Shuttle
Extra
Caitlin Hinshelwood, Kissing the Shuttle
Published: 19 Sep 2017

US Hispanic Women: Educated, Powerful & Influential

Extra
Some 40% of US Hispanic women say that people often seek their advice before buying something

American Latinas (Hispanic women) are increasingly well-educated, progressing financially and influencing mainstream buying behaviour, according to a new report from global market research company Nielsen. Highlights include:  

  • Latina Ascent: US Hispanic women are entering the workforce in increasing numbers. Over the last five years, the number of female majority-owned firms in America rose by 27%, while Latina majority-owned firms grew by 87%. In the same period, the number of Hispanic male majority-owned firms increased by 39%.
  • Culturally Proud: Connection to their culture and language is vital for US Latinas. While only 34% are born outside the country, around three-quarters (74%) speak a language other than English at home. Although four-fifths (81%) speak English well, 95% of foreign-born Hispanic women and 59% of those born in the US speak at least some Spanish at home.
  • Influencing Purchases: Latinas hold sway over purchasing decisions, with 40% of Hispanic women saying that people often seek their advice before buying something. Their children have the power when it comes to the purchases they make: 51% agree their kids have a significant impact on the brands they choose.
  • Choosing Singledom: Latina marriage rates in the US are low, with many women opting to marry later or not at all. Those born in America are less likely to get married than their foreign-born peers. Around one-quarter (24%) of US-born female Hispanic millennials (aged 18 to 34) have married, compared to 44% of those born elsewhere.

For more insights on bicultural Hispanic consumers, see Culture Guardians and Hispanicize 2016.

Published: 18 Sep 2017

S/S 18 Influencer Show: Simone Rocha

Simone Rocha delivered one of the prettiest collections of the season so far, tapping into the emerging mood for escapism with silhouettes straight from the Victorian nursery.

Extra
Simone Rocha S/S 18
Extra
Simone Rocha S/S 18
Extra
Simone Rocha S/S 18

The look was the culmination of the Victorian/Edwardian influences that have underpinned the high street in recent seasons, with frou-frou ruffles and flounces adding volume to swingy, smock-shaped dresses.

Pouffed bubble hemlines added to the babydoll look, highlighted with a palette of crisp white and palest balletic pinks, along with the quirky, homespun embroidered doll motifs tracing the edges of soft, undulating frills. Rocha delivered a darker Victoriana mood in the collection’s black taffetas, jet beading and funereal satins, alleviated by sprigged rosebud florals and simplistic sequined daisy flowers on sheers. 

Extra
Simone Rocha S/S 18
Extra
Simone Rocha S/S 18
Extra
Simone Rocha S/S 18

Crisp cottons, broderie anglaise, organza and ethereal tulle were offset with the more sculptural appeal of moire taffetas and the rustic touch of rose-patterned, homespun tweeds, with their tufted floral trims. Meanwhile, elegantly worked bias satin dresses straight from a 30s boudoir delivered a change of tack.

It may not have been the season’s most commercial collection, but it perfectly encapsulated the emerging mood for a return to simpler, childlike-times. There were plenty of influences to inspire party developments, along with covetable accessories like the squishy clutch bag, cellophane-look sandals and red velvet Mary Janes.

Extra
Simone Rocha S/S 18
Extra
Simone Rocha S/S 18
Extra
Simone Rocha S/S 18

NEED TO KNOW 

  • Childlike, babydoll looks
  • Taffetas, organza and frothy tulles for voluminous ruffled silhouettes
  • Ruffles and frills continue, highlighted with naïve embroidery motifs
  • Multiple layers of contrasting fabrics for tone-on-tone texture
  • Sequined flower motifs, sprigged florals and tufted flower shapes
  • Velvet accessories.
Published: 18 Sep 2017

S/S 18 Influencer Show: Burberry

It may have been a ‘see now, buy now’ collection targeted at A/W 17/18, but chief creative officer Christopher Bailey’s latest outing showed he’s way ahead of the curve when it comes to influencing trends for S/S 18.

Extra
Burberry S/S 18
Extra
Burberry S/S 18
Extra
Burberry S/S 18

The current seasonless approach to design had plenty of resonance for London Fashion Week S/S 18, with a show that stepped way out of Burberry’s customary luxury box. A change of venue and a well-worn soundtrack rather than the usual live performance immediately set the scene for a more low-key, less glamorous collection.

A youthful mix of high-low looks turned heritage in all its forms – both the house archive and established British tradition – on its head. After a decade of rebranding the iconic house check with a new subtlety, Bailey shifted tack and delivered the full-on Burberry experience in all its familiar glory – from checked baseball caps and accessories to outerwear.

Extra
Burberry S/S 18
Extra
Burberry S/S 18
Extra
Burberry S/S 18

It was those outerwear pieces that chimed with S/S 18’s emerging trend for all-weather plasticised and cire looks, with sporty anoraks and lightweight capes worked in house checks and sugary pastels, layered over tonal satin skirts and embroidered tulle dresses. 

There were plenty of influencer pieces to inspire fast-response retailers, with chunky melanged cardigans, pastel faux-shearling chubbies and slouchy white trackies – here teamed incongruously with a luxe Burberry check plastic anorak.

The high-low appeal of the collection was taken to the max with neon trims on house-check accessories, chunky marled socks teamed with sexy gold sandals, and clear plastic buttons trimming luxe outerwear pieces. 

Extra
Burberry S/S 18
Extra
Burberry S/S 18
Extra
Burberry S/S 18

NEED TO KNOW

  • High-low approach to fabrications – think silk satins and embroidered tulle with cire nylons and plastic-coated finishes
  • Mixed plaids and traditional tartans
  • Winter darks with candy-coated pastels
  • Fair Isle knits and patchwork crochet effects
  • Zipped boxy checked bags and oversized totes
  • Statement diamante earrings.
Published: 18 Sep 2017

Vegan Cruise Launches

Extra
Cruise and Maritime Voyages

UK-based cruise operator Cruise and Maritime Voyages (CMV) is launching a vegan-only cruise, which will set sail to the Norwegian fjords this month.

A collaboration with UK ethical tour operator Vegan Travel, the cruise will feature meat-, fish- and dairy-free breakfast buffets and four to five course dinners and lunches paired with organic wines, all inspired by the regions visited during the journey.

The cruise will also cater for those with dietary requirements such as gluten-free, raw and macrobiotic. All rooms will also come equipped with high-end, dairy-free, organic toiletries including hand wash, shampoo and shower gel.

It will also feature a wellness programme including yoga and Pilates and daytime activities such as ethical cheese and toothpaste making classes. Guest speakers will include UK television personality Wendy Turner Webster, US best-selling author Dr Michael Greger and Harvard-educated psychologist Melanie Joy on topics ranging from the environment and ethical farming to health and nutrition.

The cruise is targeted at all ages, including children, who are usually restricted from CMV's cruises.

Seattle-based cruise line Holland America Line is launching a similar themed cruise concept in October 2017. Its Vegan Vacation At Sea, which will sail around Mexico, will offer vegan menus, environment-focused shore excursions and parties.

For more on how cruise providers are upping their game to entice new breeds of traveller, see Compressed Cruising, All Aboard: Millennials & Cruises and Artisan Gin-Tasting Cruise.

In addition, ethical strands of wellness continue to permeate the travel space in new and unexpected ways. See Travel for the Agile Elite, Hospitality for the Kind Consumer and Wandering Wellness.

Published: 18 Sep 2017

Lego House Experience Hub & Fan Centre Leverages Play

Extra
Legohouse

Danish toy giant Lego is epitomising the rising trend for store HQs – brand hubs that blend internal practice with fan culture – with the impending launch (September 28) of its play-centric Lego House experience centre at its headquarters in Billund, Denmark.

Designed by acclaimed Danish architects Bjarke Ingels Group, the multi-storey complex is a very literal visual manifestation of the brand – comprised of a stacking configuration of 21 white brick-like spaces with primary coloured tops.  

Echoing Adidas’ Runbase Berlin space (see Membership & Tiered Retailing), much of the venue requires tickets (€20/$24). These give guests access to six experience zones focused on four key play-focused learning competences: creative, social, emotional and cognitive.

The first floor’s Red Zone deals in creativity, with expert-led creative labs that encourage fans to submit product ideas (see Intimate, Democratic & Inclusive). The Green Zone is focused on social activity, allowing fans to co-direct films populated by Lego characters. In the Blue Zone, cognitive abilities are stimulated – with visitors able to engineer cities and robots. Emotions take centre stage in the Yellow Zone, prompting kids to scan Lego brick fish creations (devised to elicit a sense of empathy) and follow them in a digital fish tank.

Visitors without a ticket can still get involved, accessing outdoor playgrounds on nine staggered terraces, viewing fan-built Lego ‘masterpieces’ in the top floor gallery, or visiting the ground floor’s store, three restaurants, events atrium and 2,000 sq m public square.

Lego expects approximately 250,000 guests per year.

See also Kids-Centric Commerce and Beta Blends: Dynamic & Dexterous Design, publishing September 25.

Published: 15 Sep 2017

KFC China’s Renewed Health Focus

Extra
KFC China

The Chinese arm of global fried chicken chain KFC has launched a new rum and raspberry flavoured non-alcoholic cocktail called Mojito Girl, aimed at Chinese Generation Z consumers.

To promote the launch, it created an ad campaign with global ad agency McCann Worldgroup focusing on the idea that fun can be had without drinking alcohol. Running across digital media channels including Chinese social media platforms Weibo and WeChat, the quirky campaign introduces a Mojito Girl character to consumers.

This product launch and campaign ties into the trend for a healthier approach to drinking, specifically among younger consumers. See our report Asia's Millennial Alcohol Consumers for an in-depth look at how Asian alcohol brands are taking a lower-percentage approach, as well as Alcohol's Healthier Future.

Meanwhile, Alcohol Trends 2015 outlines our initial thinking into moderate drinking habits being adopted by younger consumers as they prioritise health over hedonism.

KFC has also recently launched a new concept store in Hangzhou that offers a healthier menu, steering away from its famous fried chicken. The restaurant, named K Pro, serves fresh juices, salads and paninis with high-protein fillings such as smoked salmon and chicken.

These innovations are great examples of how traditional fast food operators are evolving their offering to appeal to an ever more health-conscious consumer. Refer to Fast Food Shifts Mechanics for more on this shift.

See also our New Food Frontiers Industry Trend for more on the intersection of wellness, nutrition and technology.

Published: 14 Sep 2017

Comme des Garcons x Andy Warhol: Art-Inspired Fragrance

Extra
Andy Warhol's 'You're In Perfume' by Comme des Garcons

Art and fragrance combine for Comme des Garcons Parfum’s latest launch – a reimagining of American artist Andy Warhol’s notorious unisex scent You’re In.

The collaboration with the Andy Warhol Foundation pays homage to his original 1967 work – a series of Coke bottles spray-painted silver and filled with a yellow-hued citrus perfume. The project was contested by Coca-Cola and subsequently abandoned.

Comme des Garcons’ new wearable equivalent takes inspiration from the original, with chief top notes of bitter orange, aldehydes and makrut lime zest. The matt silver bottles are housed in bright red and yellow packaging with bold Warhol-inspired graphics, all embracing his creative principles and aesthetic. The bottles also feature one of six whimsical Warhol quotes, including “I never read, I just look at pictures” and “Art is what you can get away with”. See Elevating Beauty: The New Rules of Luxury and 2017: Look Ahead – Beauty for more on art-inspired packaging.

The perfume will be available in London’s Dover Street Market from September 15, and internationally throughout September and October. Proceeds will contribute to the Warhol Foundation’s endowment, which distributes grants to support contemporary art.

With the acceptance of olfactory art on the rise (see Esxence 2017), artist-formulated and art-inspired scents provide a refreshing narrative to fragrance experiences, offering different sensorial touchpoints for consumers and increasing the cultural value of perfume. 

See AIX Scent Fair 2016 for more on artisanal and niche fragrance concepts. Also look out for Pitti Fragranze 2017: Changing Scent Trends, publishing soon.

Published: 14 Sep 2017

Scent, Emotions & the Subconscious: Shopper Brain Conference

Extra
Shopper Brain Conference

The Shopper Brain Conference, to be held in Amsterdam from October 5-6 2017, promises to explore the intersection between retail and consumer-centric neuroscience. Topics will include the hidden psychological drivers behind purchasing behaviour in a digitised, multichannel era, and the best ways to build emotional attachment.

Here are some of our most anticipated sessions:

  • Scent in a Virtual World: Andy Myers, director at UK neuro-marketing consultancy Walnut, will speak about the role of scent in improving retail experiences, including how it can be used in conjunction with virtual reality, and what a multisensory approach means for the future of physical retail environments. 
  • Psychology of Seamlessness: Ana Iorga, founder & chief neuroscientist of UK consultancy Buyer Brain, will delve into the psychology behind the growing demand for seamless, low-hassle retail experiences.
  • Motivational Levers: Frank Buckler, chief executive of German strategy consultancy Success Drivers, will discuss Artificial Creativity, a project deploying machine learning to uncover the best emotional levers for different consumer groups. It found, for instance, that the best way to sell products to mothers is to talk about their intelligence, rather than focusing on their children, as might be expected.

  • Emotional Intelligence: Liraz Margalit, head of behavioural research at US digital customer experience agency Clicktale, will focus on online shopping and the current psychology behind it. She will explain how to use data and non-verbal signals, including emotion recognition tech, to build a more cohesive, in-depth picture of a consumer’s state of mind.

Full coverage will be published on October 16.

TOPICS: Retail

Updated
Related
© 
PANTONE®TPX
COATED
RAL
RGB
HEX
NCS